Professional Coaching

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Professional Coaching

Leading Interactions Summary
The LDP Leading Interactions Summary reveals the individual’s likely comfort level with 20 key elements of leadership, allowing coaches and trainers to focus on specific development opportunities.

In order to gain a competitive advantage through available talent, today’s employers must maintain an intense focus on training and development. Increasingly, this focus has expanded to include efforts aimed at developing one’s personal characteristics in preparation for specific roles. For example, a service technician is groomed for their first supervisory position, one which requires higher degrees of Assertiveness and Openness than their previous job. Recognizing such needs is made possible by the LDP’s developmental reports, such as the Personal Style Profile, Leading Profile and Leading Interactions Summary.

PDTraining of Australia uses the LDP to identify specific activities which may present the most challenge for an emerging leader. Customized action plans are then developed, allowing the individual and the employer to make the most of training resources. In today’s economic climate, offering targeted professional development programs allows coaching professionals to provide the greatest return on investment for their clients.

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As a staffing business, we have been working with the Leading Dimensions Profile instrument as a resource for selecting and developing our internal staff.  We also use the LDP as a value added service that we introduce to our clients to impact their ability to hire right the first time and improve employee engagement.  To date, we have experienced outstanding customer service, analysis, and interpretation concerning assessment results.  In a recent instance of using the LDP as an internal selection tool, we assessed an employee who showed the dimensions consistent with a successful staffing sales rep.  We moved the employee into the sales re role, and she has now been successfully transitioned – resulting in a significant increase in our sales activity.    

Staffing Business Owner

We found the LDP to be helpful to us in making our hiring decision. We had about 78 applicants for this particular position and we had narrowed it down to the top four. The LDP assessment actually helped us to fine tune the process and gave us more confidence in making that decision.

– Dr. Hinkley, Associate Professor & Chairperson

about the LDP framework

The LDP describes a person’s work style by measuring two primary sources of drive and motivation (Achievement Drive and Relational Drive) and ten supporting dimensions:

Achievement Drive describes the focus and intensity with which an individual approaches common activities as well as long-term goals. At opposite ends of the Achievement Drive continuum, are two primary behavioral patterns: Methodical and Urgent. The five supporting characteristics, referred to as Achieving Dimensions, include:

  • Intensity, the drive to extend effort in meeting or exceeding expectations when performing common tasks.
  • Assertiveness, the confidence level in approaching one’s role and in asserting opinions.
  • Risk Tolerance, the propensity to accept risk in making decisions or taking actions in uncertain situations.
  • Adaptability, the interest in, or comfort level with changing or unplanned circumstances.
  • Decision-making, the extent to which one relies on intuition and experience (versus methodical analysis) in making decisions.

Relational Drive describes the extent to which an individual engages relationally in common circumstances. At opposite ends of the Relational Drive continuum, are two primary behavioral patterns: Guarded and Expressive. The five supporting characteristics, referred to as the Relating Dimensions, include:

  • Status Motivation, the drive to be personally recognized for efforts and accomplishments.
  • Consideration, the awareness of, and propensity to contemplate others’ feelings and needs.
  • Openness, the desire to learn and share personal information with others, including strangers.
  • Affiliation, the desire to collaborate or affiliate with others in performing common activities.
  • Self-protection, the level of trust in the intentions or reliability of others.